Review: All The Wicked Girls

October 16, 2017 in Book Reviews, Crime, Mystery

I received this book for free from Publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Review: All The Wicked GirlsAll The Wicked Girls by Chris Whitaker
Published by Bonnier Zaffre on 24th August 2017
Genres: Crime, Mystery
Format: ARC
Source: Publisher
Goodreads
four-stars

Everyone loves Summer Ryan. A model student and musical prodigy, she's a ray of light in the struggling small town of Grace, Alabama - especially compared to her troubled sister, Raine.

Then Summer goes missing. Grace is already simmering, and with this new tragedy the police have their hands full keeping the peace. Only Raine throws herself into the search, supported by a most unlikely ally.

But perhaps there was always more to Summer than met the eye . . .

When Summer Ryan goes missing in Grace, Alabama, it is feared that she is another Briar Girl. Girls have been going missing and the Police Dept is yet to uncover the truth of their disappearances.

So Summer’s twin sister Raine takes it upon herself to find her sister, and enlists the help of two local boys Noah and Purv. Noah’s late father was a police officer and Noah wants to emulate him and his heroism. While Summer and Raine may be twins they are very different. Summer is academic and musical, Raine hangs out with guys getting drunk. As different as they may be they love each other fiercely and Raine will do whatever it takes to find her twin.

This novel is packed full of characters and somehow in just 339 pages we get an insight into their histories. That in itself is impressive. I’ll admit being overwhelmed at first by the number of names; my foggy brain couldn’t keep up. But slowly we uncover more about them all and the citizens of Grace, Alabama, seem a lot more real, more than a blend of names.

As we follow Noah, Purv and Raine while they try to find Summer (throwing themselves into harm’s way in the process), we are also treated to chapters from Summer. Through these chapters we learn more about the missing girl, much more.

Then, of course, there are the other missing girls, the Briar Girls – will they ever solve the mystery? Perhaps with Noah and co. on the case.

I don’t want to give you much more information for fear of spoiling the evolution of this story. What I will say is that this is not only a mystery novel but a look into a small community where that person next door you might look to have it all, may actually have their own hidden struggles and secrets.

four-stars

Blog Tour: Bluebird, Bluebird *Giveaway*

October 3, 2017 in Blog Tours, Book Reviews, Crime, Current Giveaways

Welcome to today’s stop on the Bluebird, Bluebird blog tour!

BB blog tour image

I received this book for free from Publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Blog Tour: Bluebird, Bluebird *Giveaway*Bluebird, Bluebird by Attica Locke
Series: Highway 59 #1
Published by Serpent's Tail on 28th September 2017
Genres: Crime
Pages: 320
Format: eARC
Source: Publisher
Goodreads
four-half-stars

Southern fables usually go the other way around. A white woman is killed or harmed in some way, real or imagined, and then, like the moon follows the sun, a black man ends up dead.

But when it comes to law and order, East Texas plays by its own rules - a fact that Darren Mathews, a black Texas Ranger working the backwoods towns of Highway 59, knows all too well. Deeply ambivalent about his home state, he was the first in his family to get as far away from Texas as he could. Until duty called him home.

So when allegiance to his roots puts his job in jeopardy, he is drawn to a case in the small town of Lark, where two dead bodies washed up in the bayou. First a black lawyer from Chicago and then, three days later, a local white woman, and it's stirred up a hornet's nest of resentment. Darren must solve the crimes - and save himself in the process - before Lark's long-simmering racial fault lines erupt.

There are times when you read a novel and know it will stay with you for a long time; such was the case for me with Bluebird, Bluebird. Far more than a crime novel, this well-written, immersive book shines a spotlight upon racial tensions in East Texas.

Through Darren Mathews, a black Texas Ranger whose family hail from the state, we are given a glimpse into a world where a white woman’s death is investigated, but the suspicious death of a black man is left unexplored.  Darren gives us an insight into the life of a black law enforcer in an area where such a man is a rarity, an area which houses the Aryan Brotherhood of Texas. Through his investigations, we are drawn into the racial politics and educated on what life is like (badge or no) when you are unwelcome in your own homeland.

I was thoroughly absorbed by this story. Having never read any of Locke’s work before, I was extremely taken with her storytelling and prose. The mystery aspect of the story is fascinating, however, it’s the look through the microscope at small-town East Texas life and the dynamics surrounding it that I found really made this novel. It’s a thought-provoking book and Locke raises many very pertinent issues. At times I was incredulous (and perhaps very naive) to find that this type of racism still occurs so freely in the world.  It’s a very timely novel that will no doubt impact the reader and leave a lasting impression.

**GIVEAWAY**

I’m delighted to say that I have a copy of this impressive and thought-provoking novel to give away to one reader in the UK. To be in with a chance of winning simply use the rafflecopter entry form below.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Good luck!

four-half-stars

Review: Quieter Than Killing

March 7, 2017 in Book Reviews, Crime

I received this book for free from Publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Review: Quieter Than KillingQuieter Than Killing by Sarah Hilary
Series: DI Marnie Rome #4
Published by Headline on 9th March 2017
Genres: Crime
Format: ARC
Source: Publisher
Goodreads
five-stars

It's winter, the nights are dark and freezing, and a series of seemingly random assaults is pulling DI Marnie Rome and DS Noah Jake out onto streets of London. When Marnie's family home is ransacked, there are signs that the burglary can have only been committed by someone who knows her. Then a child goes missing, yet no-one has reported it. Suddenly, events seem connected, and it's personal.

Someone out there is playing games. It is time for both Marnie and Noah to face the truth about the creeping, chilling reaches of a troubled upbringing. Keeping quiet can be a means of survival, but the effects can be as terrible as killing.

For the past few years, my most-anticipated release list has included Sarah Hilary’s latest works. We’re now onto the fourth book of the DI Marnie Rome series and Hilary never fails to impress me. Her storytelling sweeps me up, diving into her books is like meeting up with old friends – and I love it!

The case in this book is compelling. There has been a series of attacks and Marnie and Noah are tasked with finding the culprits. Are the attacks connected? One again Hilary has woven her narrative, teasing and tripping me up along the way.

For me though, what I really enjoyed most about this book was spending more time with Marnie and Noah. I feel that by now, book four, we have a good handle on their characters, we know their histories and Hilary ensures we become even more invested in our protagonists.

I feel that I say this after every Hilary book, but Sarah handles the issues involved in Quieter Than Killing with great respect. It’s one of the things I love about her writing; she takes care and consideration with any issues she addresses, yet doesn’t detract from the story or lose any of the impact. If anything, it adds more impact!

I could sit here and gush about Sarah Hilary’s novels all day long. Her stories are realistic and believable, her characters relatable. Hilary references real-life news events to anchor her stories into our lives. I love her ongoing development of Marnie and Noah’s lives, and feel we are being drawn in closer with each passing page.

All in all, Quieter Than Killing is a fantastic addition to the series. It will raise many questions, but not all of them having answers!

five-stars

Review: Ragdoll

February 22, 2017 in Blog Tours, Book Reviews, Crime

I received this book for free from Publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Review: RagdollRagdoll by Daniel Cole
Published by Trapeze on 23rd February 2017
Genres: Crime
Format: ARC
Source: Publisher
Goodreads
four-half-stars

A body is discovered with the dismembered parts of six victims stitched together like a puppet, nicknamed by the press as the 'ragdoll'.

Assigned to the shocking case are Detective William 'Wolf' Fawkes, recently reinstated to the London Met, and his former partner Detective Emily Baxter.

The 'Ragdoll Killer' taunts the police by releasing a list of names to the media, and the dates on which he intends to murder them.

With six people to save, can Fawkes and Baxter catch a killer when the world is watching their every move?

I’m so pleased to be one of the stops on the Ragdoll blog tour today! Make sure you check out all of the other victims too!

Ragdoll blog tour

If you frequent Twitter, you are probably aware of the hype surrounding this book. For this reason, I couldn’t wait to read it but, as ever, was worried it might not live up to the hype. I’m so glad to say that it absolutely did – I really enjoyed this debut novel. I couldn’t put it down!

DS William Fawkes, known as Wolf, is an interesting character with a somewhat chequered past. When a corpse is found that is actually body parts from six corpses sewn together, Ragdoll, Fawkes and his colleagues undertake the murder investigations. However, the killer has released a list of his next victims along with the dates he intends to murder them. Wolf’s name is on that list. As the team try to uncover the identities of “Ragdoll”, prevent the deaths of the listed and trace the killer, they face a battle against the media who ensure that the world is watching.

This book kept me glued from the outset. The case, the twists and turns all had me craving more information.

Despite his flaws, I really liked Wolf. I also really enjoyed the interaction between him and his colleagues. I find that I often struggle to connect with the ‘colleagues’ in this type of novel, however that absolutely wasn’t the case. I felt we got to know Baxter, Edmunds and Finlay, and appreciate their characters too.

Despite the nature of this book, I found myself chuckling at times. There’s some great banter and one-liners that help to distract from the darkness of the story.

It’s always a good sign when you reach the final chapter of a book and realise that you aren’t quite ready to leave its characters behind. This is undoubtedly the case with Ragdoll and so I’m delighted to see that it’s the first book in a series.

This book is thrilling, fast-paced (to the point I had to go back and reread some pages to make sure I had absorbed all of the information) and most definitely memorable. I can’t wait to read Coles’ next instalment!

four-half-stars

Blog Tour & Review: The Dry

January 13, 2017 in Blog Tours, Book Reviews, Crime, Mystery

I received this book for free from Publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Blog Tour & Review: The DryThe Dry by Jane Harper
Published by Little Brown UK on 12th January 2017
Genres: Crime, Mystery
Format: Hardback
Source: Publisher
Goodreads
four-stars

After getting a note demanding his presence, Federal Agent Aaron Falk arrives in his hometown for the first time in decades to attend the funeral of his best friend, Luke. Twenty years ago when Falk was accused of murder, Luke was his alibi. Falk and his father fled under a cloud of suspicion, saved from prosecution only because of Luke’s steadfast claim that the boys had been together at the time of the crime. But now more than one person knows they didn’t tell the truth back then, and Luke is dead.

Amid the worst drought in a century, Falk and the local detective question what really happened to Luke. As Falk reluctantly investigates to see if there’s more to Luke’s death than there seems to be, long-buried mysteries resurface, as do the lies that have haunted them. And Falk will find that small towns have always hidden big secrets.

I am very excited to be one of the stops on The Dry blog tour today!

friday

In rural Australia, the town of Kiewarra is in drought – it hasn’t rained for two years. The farming community, and subsequently the entire town are struggling. So when three members of the Hadler family are found dead, with Luke, the father, having seemingly taken his own life, the community are appalled but not entirely surprised – perhaps he was seeking a way out of the struggles for his family.

Aaron Falk, Luke’s childhood best friend, returns to the town he left twenty years ago for his friend’s funeral. Being back is hard. He can’t wait to return to his job as a Federal Agent in Melbourne and leave the memories behind. However, there’s a twenty-year secret that Luke and Aaron shared and it’s possible Luke’s death will bring the secret to light. This, coupled with Luke’s parents’ request that Aaron helps them investigate their son’s death, leads Falk to spend a lot more time in his hometown than he’d planned.

This book grabbed my attention from the first page and I honestly couldn’t put it down. This is Jane Harper’s debut novel and what a debut it is! Her scene-setting, the description of a rural Australian town desperate for rainfall is fantastic. I could almost feel the heat (impressive in a Scottish winter), taste the dust and crave the water myself.

The story itself flits between the real time post-Hadler murders and Aaron & Luke’s teenage years. This allows us to feel as though we know the dead man and, of course, helps us to understand Aaron himself more.

The mystery aspect of this book had me guessing throughout, with Harper’s writing and storytelling keeping me glued until the final word.

Yes, I know who really killed the Hadler family – and I highly recommend you find out for yourself!

four-stars