Review: The Last Namsara

October 11, 2017 in Book Reviews, YA Fantasy

I received this book for free from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Review: The Last NamsaraThe Last Namsara by Kristen Ciccarelli
Series: Iskari #1
Published by Gollancz on 12th October 2017 (UK)
Genres: Fantasy, YA Fantasy
Format: eARC
Source: NetGalley
Goodreads
four-stars

In the beginning, there was the Namsara: the child of sky and spirit, who carried love and laughter wherever he went. But where there is light, there must be dark—and so there was also the Iskari. The child of blood and moonlight. The destroyer. The death bringer.

These are the legends that Asha, daughter of the king of Firgaard, has grown up hearing in hushed whispers, drawn to the forbidden figures of the past. But it isn’t until she becomes the fiercest, most feared dragon slayer in the land that she takes on the role of the next Iskari—a lonely destiny that leaves her feeling more like a weapon than a girl.

Asha conquers each dragon and brings its head to the king, but no kill can free her from the shackles that await at home: her betrothal to the cruel commandant, a man who holds the truth about her nature in his palm. When she’s offered the chance to gain her freedom in exchange for the life of the most powerful dragon in Firgaard, she finds that there may be more truth to the ancient stories than she ever could have expected. With the help of a secret friend—a slave boy from her betrothed’s household—Asha must shed the layers of her Iskari bondage and open her heart to love, light, and a truth that has been kept from her.

Asha is the daughter of the dragon king. The people are afraid of her because she brought dragonflame upon the city as a child, telling Old Stories which attract the dragons. She herself was badly burned, but was rescued by the commandant’s son, Jarek. Now she is a hunter of dragons, a dragon slayer for her father the King who has also named her Iskari, from the Old Stories.

Asha is betrothed to the very boy who saved her. He’s commandant now, leader of her father’s armies and one of the few people who isn’t scared of her. In fact, if anything, she is scared of him.

When her father offers her the chance to call off their impending marriage, Asha leaps at the chance. Should she finally capture the First Dragon, Kozu, the very one that burned her skin and torched her city, her father would be willing to cancel the ceremony but Asha doesn’t have much time. Her quest leads her to cross paths with her betrothed’s slave, a boy called Torwin who doesn’t seem to fear her. In fact he breaks laws to look directly at her face.

There is much to love in this book – not least the dragons! Our story is told around Asha but also shares the Old Stories that she holds dear, those that remind her of her late mother. However, not only do the stories make people ill and are therefore banned, but they also draw dragons. The telling of the Old Stories attracts the dragons, which is a tempting proposition when you are hunting them, tasked with returning with their heads.

I enjoyed the storytelling style of this novel – the way the old and new cultures and beliefs were conveyed, so integral to the story yet also told as part of the tale.

I was unsure of Asha at first but I grew to like her. Honestly, and probably unsurprisingly, Torwin was my favourite character in this novel. As for other characters, I’d have liked to have seen more of Safira (Asha’s cousin) and Dax (Asha’s brother). I felt that they were kind of peripheral although they played a role in the story.

I will admit to feeling slightly overwhelmed by the world at times. It took me a while to get things straight in my mind, the different peoples, regions, names etc, but that’s probably down to my foggy brain!

I really enjoyed the writing in the novel and found it so easy to get swept up in this tale. This is the first book in a trilogy and I will most definitely be picking up book two.

four-stars

Review: Tower of Dawn

September 27, 2017 in Book Reviews, Fantasy, YA Fantasy

Review: Tower of DawnTower of Dawn by Sarah J. Maas
Series: Throne of Glass #6
Published by Bloomsbury on 5th September 2017
Genres: Fantasy
Source: Purchased
Goodreads
four-half-stars

Chaol Westfall has always defined himself by his unwavering loyalty, his strength, and his position as the Captain of the Guard. But all of that has changed since the glass castle shattered, since his men were slaughtered, since the King of Adarlan spared him from a killing blow, but left his body broken.

His only shot at recovery lies with the legendary healers of the Torre Cesme in Antica—the stronghold of the southern continent's mighty empire. And with war looming over Dorian and Aelin back home, their survival might lie with Chaol and Nesryn convincing its rulers to ally with them.

But what they discover in Antica will change them both—and be more vital to saving Erilea than they could have imagined.

In case you aren’t aware, Tower of Dawn is the Chaol novella that Maas was working out that turned into a full-length novel – 660 pages! The timing of this book coincides with the happenings of Empire of Storms, so although they are separate books they are really following the one timeline. Make sense?

I was pretty excited to hear that Chaol would get his own novella, so I was delighted when I heard it had developed into an entire novel! I completely loved Chaol in the first two books of this series but felt he got a raw deal in the latter books. I really hoped that without Aelin as the focus we’d get Chaol back, and I think we did!

Aside from the prospect of a whole book about Chaol, I was very interested as to how Maas would handle his injury and wheelchair use. Many of you know that I have mobility issues and frequently require the use of my wheelchair as a result of illness. So I was equally intrigued (and rather nervous) as to how it and Chaol’s adjustment to his new life would be handled.

On the whole, I was very happy with the way Maas dealt with Chaol’s injury. She really captured many of the issues that  I myself have struggled with since needing help and the use of my chair to get about. In fact, there were passages where I cried, such was the impact, relevance, and portrayal of Chaol’s battles. At times I felt like Sarah was writing about me, particularly in that first half of the book. I’m very grateful to Maas for bringing these issues into her hugely popular books. While Chaol’s struggles won’t reflect everyone, they certainly reflect mine and I’m grateful that, through Chaol, some awareness may be raised.

I appreciated that while Chaol was being treated with magic, he still had to fight. It was a process, a battle. View Spoiler »

As for the story itself, I’ve seen people say that it didn’t need to be as long as it was. Perhaps that’s the case, but I would’ve read it at twice the length.

Yes, it was kind of predictable in places but I really didn’t care, as there was much that wasn’t predictable. In fact there were a couple of bombshells! We find out a lot more about Antica, Erilea and the Valg. If you think this is a secondary novel and you aren’t sure about reading then let me say that you must; there is important information in this book!

I also really loved how Maas continues to reintroduce her novella characters in this series. If you haven’t read The Assassin’s Blade collection of prequel novellas then I urge you to do so to get the most from this novel and the series as a whole.

All in all, I really enjoyed this novel and getting to spend more time with Chaol. I loved meeting the new characters, learning more about the world and I just can’t wait for book seven!

four-half-stars

Review: Godsgrave

September 22, 2017 in Book Reviews, Fantasy

I received this book for free from Publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Review: GodsgraveGodsgrave by Jay Kristoff
Series: The Nevernight Chronicle #2
Published by Harper Voyager on 7th September 2017
Genres: Fantasy
Format: ARC
Source: Publisher
Goodreads
five-stars

Mia Corvere has found her place among the Blades of Our Lady of Blessed Murder, but many in the Red Church hierarchy think she’s far from earned it. Plying her bloody trade in a backwater of the Republic, she’s no closer to ending the men who destroyed her familia; in fact, she’s told directly that Consul Scaeva is off limits. But after a deadly confrontation with an old enemy, Mia suspicions about the Red Church’s true motives begin to grow.

When it’s announced that Scaeva will be making a rare public appearance at the conclusion of the grand games in Godsgrave, Mia defies the Church and sells herself to a gladiatorial collegium for a chance to finally end him. Upon the sands of the arena, Mia finds new allies, bitter rivals, and more questions about her strange affinity for the shadows. But as conspiracies unfold within the collegium walls, and the body count rises, Mia will be forced to choose between love and revenge, and uncover a secret that could change the very face of her world.

So, if you haven’t read Nevernight then either go pick up a copy or check out my post with 6 reasons to read it. Godsgrave is the second book in The Nevernight Chronicle and while I won’t be discussing Godsgrave spoilers there will inevitably be Nevernight spoilers.

Ok, so Mia is now a blade – after Lord Cassius anointed her one prior to his death. As well as her original passenger Mister Kindly, Mia now also has the company of the late Lord Cassius’ shadow wolf, Eclipse. I have to say I wasn’t entirely sure about the banter between these two shadow characters to begin with, but actually, I grew to really like it!

Mia has not given up on her intention to kill Duomo and Scaeva in order to seek justice for her family. However her blade status does complicate things somewhat and so Mia, in true Mia-style, comes up with an outlandish, if cunning, plan to finally end her foes.

There is so much to love in this book – not least Mia, who really is an incredible character. She took me on a bit of a rollercoaster in this book, but that’s what all good characters do, right?

There are some interesting new characters in this second book and I really like the way that Kristoff incorporated them, as well as the reemergence of some more familiar characters.

As you’d expect having read Nevernight, this book is filled with blood, fighting, death, profanities, poison; I mean it’s probably not for everyone. But if you’re a Nevernight fan, then you know what to expect!

Kristoff is such an incredible writer. I love the way he involves the reader in this story, with added sarcasm to boot! I was worried Godsgrave  wouldn’t live up to my high expectations but it really did. I had no idea where the story was going to go and I love the direction it took!

I’m not quite sure how we are meant to wait another year for the final book in this trilogy. I’ve provisionally marked it in my 2018 diary already!

five-stars

Review: Godblind

September 15, 2017 in Book Reviews, Fantasy

I received this book for free from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Review: GodblindGodblind by Anna Stephens
Series: The Godblind Trilogy #1
Published by Harper Voyager on 15th June 2017
Genres: Fantasy
Format: eARC
Source: NetGalley
Goodreads
three-stars

The Mireces worship the bloodthirsty Red Gods. Exiled from Rilpor a thousand years ago, and left to suffer a harsh life in the cold mountains, a new Mireces king now plots an invasion of Rilpor’s thriving cities and fertile earth.

Dom Templeson is a Watcher, a civilian warrior guarding Rilpor’s border. He is also the most powerful seer in generations, plagued with visions and prophecies. His people are devoted followers of the god of light and life, but Dom harbors deep secrets, which threaten to be exposed when Rillirin, an escaped Mireces slave, stumbles broken and bleeding into his village.

Meanwhile, more and more of Rilpor’s most powerful figures are turning to the dark rituals and bloody sacrifices of the Red Gods, including the prince, who plots to wrest the throne from his dying father in the heart of the kingdom. Can Rillirin, with her inside knowledge of the Red Gods and her shocking ties to the Mireces King, help Rilpor win the coming war?

I’d heard a lot of great things about this book prior to picking it up. Fantasy told from the perspectives of multiple characters, Gods trying to regain entry to the world, people and cultures with their own beliefs, men vying to be King, it all sounded pretty good. And it was. I really enjoyed the first half of the book, maybe even up to 70% but then I kind of got bored, which surprised me as the last part of the book has fighting, battles, action. Yet I got bored of reading passages of fighting, injury, blood, death. Why? Well, I’ve been trying to figure that out. I think there was just too much description, too many fight scenes and I just lost interest. Also, I’m not sure that I really cared about any of the characters, except Crys.

Believe me, I’m really disappointed, I wanted to love this. Indeed to begin with I was absorbed by the story and the world. I kept hoping I’d get back to that but it just didn’t happen for me.

If you’ve read this I’d love to know your thoughts. I think I’m definitely in the minority with this. Maybe I just wasn’t in the right mood?

All that said, this is a creative book – I enjoyed the world building and concepts, but sadly it didn’t hold my attention.

three-stars

Review: Dark Immolation

June 23, 2017 in Book Reviews, Fantasy

I received this book for free from Publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

Review: Dark ImmolationDark Immolation by Christopher Husberg
Series: The Chaos Queen
Published by Titan on 20th June 2017
Genres: Fantasy
Format: Paperback
Source: Publisher
Goodreads
four-half-stars

There are rumours in Ashta - a new religion is rising, and Cinzia, one-time Cantic priestess, has escaped the Holy Crucible. Fleeing from Navone, Cinzia travels with Knot, a man of many parts, and Astrid, the child-like vampire. They are gathering followers, but the murderous Nazaniin are still on their trail. Meanwhile, Winter is losing her grip on sanity, grappling with immense powers beyond her understanding. Where she goes, chaos and death follow.

Dark Immolation, the second book in The Chaos Queen quintet, is a title I’ve been looking forward to all year. Last June I had the pleasure of reviewing book one, Duskfall (you can find my thoughts here) and this debut novel impressed me so much I couldn’t wait to revisit the world and its characters.

Dark Immolation continues where Duskfall left off. While we get answers to many questions in this book there’s still plenty to keep us wondering!

The characters in this book are what really makes it for me, and Husberg flawlessly glides from the POV of one character to another. Knot and Astrid are as brilliant as ever – I’d love to hang out with those two!

Sometimes the second book in a series can feel a bit of a letdown but I absolutely did not feel that with Dark Immolation. I enjoyed the continuation of our characters’ adventures as well as some glimpses into the past and the Void.

This is a series that I’m so glad I picked up. I can’t wait to see what Husberg has in store for us in book three!

four-half-stars